Star Quality
by Joan Collins
Book Review by Amy Coffin
Reviews Sorted by Author's Last Name
Reviews Sorted by Book Title
Reviews Sorted by Author's Last Name
Reviews Sorted by Book Title
Recent Additions
Click pic to go to Amazon.com
Like the Book? Buy it Now!
Star Quality is a multi-generational tale of love, lust, fame, fortune and jealousy. Joan Collins' steamy tale follows three women through the highs and lows of their lives. Millie quits her job an as English servant and becomes pregnant with a wealthy man's child. Heartbreak and tragedy force her to leave her daughter Vickie behind as she searches for a better life in the States. Millie eventually finds fame and fortune as a Roaring 20's Broadway Star.

When Vickie eventually comes to America, she barely knows her mother. Fortunately, Vickie is blessed with good looks. As an adult, she builds a successful movie career. However, just like her mother, she yearns for a love she cannot have.

Vickie's daughter, Lucinda, occupies the last third of Star Quality. "Lulu" leaves home to become a supermodel, because she too is blessed with striking beauty. She soon heads down a path of destruction that will end the family line if she doesn't get her act together.

Patsy is a witness waiting in the wings. She believes Millie thwarted her chance at English aristocracy. She stews and plots revenge on the women throughout the entire century.

All of the characters in Star Quality are two-dimensional figures. Their actions and reactions to each other are uninspired. Dialogue is flat and often funny when it's not supposed to be so.

Collins uses a 20th century timeline as a guide along which to move the plot. She relies on the dropping of famous names an entertainment clichés to add elements of glamour to the story. Unfortunately, all this crutch does is force the pace forward through the years.

Of course, nobody reads Joan Collins' work for its literary significance. Star Quality is an entertaining read, just not a convincing one.


JoanCollins.net


Sibling Rivalry:
Check out The World is Full of Divorced Women, by Jackie Collins